Buaiso Museum, Tokyo

“Buaiso” is the former home of Mr. And Mrs. Shirasu. Today a museum of the couple and is kept as it appeared when they lived there.

Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Shirasu Jiro and his wife Masako purchased the old farmhouse at Tsurukawa village (now Machida city, Tokyo) in 1940, and they came moved there in 1943.
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Jiro named their new house “Buaiso 武相荘” after the location, because it lay astride Musashi “武蔵” area and Sagami  “相模” area.  (“” means a cottage.)   And the name has another meaning, Buaiso is a homophone of “不愛想” that means unaffable.  It was his humor.

 

Who is Shirasu Jiro and Shirasu Masako?

Shirasu Jiro (17 February 1902 – 28 November 1985) was a Japanese diplomat and businessman.  He was a member of Shigeru Yoshida’s government during the Occupation.    His wife Masako (7 January 1910 – 26 December 1998) was a collector and expert of fine Japanese art, on which she published a number of books.  The article “Masako Shirasu: woman of the world” of Japan Times will help you understand her.

 

They both studied overseas.  Jiro studied at Clare College, Cambridge and Masako studied at The Hartridge School (now Wardlaw-Hartridge School), New Jersey.
So then a Western way of life that appears throughout their house and equipment.

Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo

 

In the farmhouse with a dilapidated thatched-roof, there are various adorable equipment, antique art, and serving dishes that Masako collected through her eyes.  (Pictures prohibited in the house.  Official site shows some images.)

Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo

It has a peculiar ambience with Western way and Japanese traditional.

 

There is a stone pagoda in the garden.   When Jiro died, she buried his hair under the pagoda.

Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
Buaiso Museum, Tokyo

 

Listening to the sound of the wind through bamboo leaves, close my eyes.

Buaiso Museum, Tokyo
It would be heard their silence voice.